Archive for February, 2013

February 27, 2013

Content marketing has haters? Seriously?

Wasn’t aware until now that content marketing had haters (really folks, you can’t come up with anything else more deserving of your contempt?). But I love the way Velocity Partners’ Doug Kessler goes on the defensive with “Why the content marketing backlash is getting it wrong.”

http://www.velocitypartners.co.uk/our-blog/the-content-marketing-backlash-is-getting-it-wrong/

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February 24, 2013

Education or entertainment? Telling the brand stories your audience wants

In advance of a Content Marketing World conference to be held soon in Sydney Australia, Content Marketing Institute founder Joe Pulizzi spoke with Australia’s Marketing magazine and offered what has to be the simplest, clearest definition of content marketing I’ve ever seen.

“The easier way to think about it is instead of telling my customers I’m great, I’m going to show them I’m great because I’m going to teach them or I’m going to entertain them.”

Content marketing/branded content advice always circles back to the idea of storytelling—but doesn’t always approach it from the point of view of the audience. Yes, your company, your brand has a story to tell—but it has to be told in a way that is meaningful, compelling or best of all, useful to the audience you want to reach. That’s essential. And Mr. P. managed to sum it up perfectly

February 2, 2013

A post from my personal blog that seemed fitting for this audience…

Her Joyful Noise

According to a handful of psychics who made practical predictions for 2013 (not the ones who speak of asteroids the size of Texas, President Obama revealing his “real” agenda and what famous celebrities ought to guard their health) along with a slew of articles about the job-less recovery and some personal observations, I think it’s safe to agree that in the future, there will be far fewer jobs.

But a whole lot of work. Someone’s got to do it.

This isn’t the first time we’ve been told this. Back in the late nineties, the term free agent was first applied to those other than professional athletes. Having been in an industry that was powered by freelancers, I didn’t see anything unusual about it. But then free agency was viewed as something performed by talented professionals with scads of work-life balance, who commanded huge fees from their chic modern home offices…

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